Best Configuration for a POC System

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This topic contains 10 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Marvin 4 years ago.

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  • #4341

    john
    Participant

    If you were about to build a P.O.C(proof Of Concept) of a system expansion would you use configuration Intel Xeon configuration S4HAH or Amd Opteron PFJAA

    and for a pilot sytem like this, would a vSMP foundation perpetual license be need it or would a annual subscription would suit it best? or are they differnt type of license?

    I have access to both system, I wish to keep this POC as simple as possible

    #4346

    Benzi
    Participant

    John,
    For the sake of clarity, for other/future readers, let me first define the configurations asked about:

    Configuration ID: S4HAH
    * Processor(s):
    – 2 x Intel E5507 [3 processor tokens each]
    * Memory: 32 GB [1 memory tokens]
    Software maintenance and support: 1 Year [first year included in base software price]

    Configuration ID: PFJAA
    * Processor(s):
    – 2 x AMD Opteron Model 6238 / 6272 [3 processor tokens each]
    * Memory: 16 GB [1 memory tokens]
    Software maintenance and support: 1 Year [first year included in base software price]

    Both configurations are valid for POC (assuming both are using certified hardware models, see http://www.ScaleMP.com/spec, and also have other needed components such as InfiniBand HCAs). As you are on the lower-end of the spec, especially with regards to RAM, I would lean towards the S4HAH configuration with 32GB RAM total (for current-days SMP applications and workloads, even 32GB RAM is considered very low).

    Both the perpetual licenses and annual subscription are valid options for a PoC.
    The annual subscription, like the name suggests, grants you use of the software for only one year, after which you will have to renew. The annual subscription licenses are cheaper (60% of the perpetual license cost) – so if you intend to “use just for trial” and later on buy completely separate/new licenses for a production environment, then that will end up costing you less. If the servers in question might end up being part of the production environment, then possibly being able to expand (with a perpetual license) might make more sense.

    #4347

    john
    Participant

    Thanks for your help and info

    #4355

    john
    Participant

    I could also test this POC on an Older system I have, this is my config: LPYFE

    basically two SR1560SF with supported Xeon processor, DDR IB directly connected. but I get conflicting pricing info as per socket of the system.. can you please confirm the per socket price for a yearly license?

    #4363

    Benzi
    Participant

    John,
    Sorry for the late reply.

    We have updated the online configurator to now include the pricing for both a perpetual license and an annual subscription (be sure to select “1” in the number of years field, to see this info)

    Please retry and let us know if it is now clear. If still not clear, please post the specific processor information for your systems (it appears like LPYFE is missing the processor information for some reason)

    Benzi

    #4590

    Marvin
    Participant

    Benzi, john idea of a POC System just got better I believe, with vSMP foundation now with a $180 per active-socket., I am glad that on your news you inclued the small installations/POC

    that was the good news, the bad news is that these lower prices are for very outdated system(no AVX), first generation nehalem based Xeons, intell is on its 4th generation Xeon(Haswell)

    #4591

    Benzi
    Participant

    @Marvin: not sure I understand the “bad news” part. The cost per socket is determined by the processor exact model, not by generation.

    For example, if you wanted to use a processor with AVX enabled, you could choose E5-2630v2 (latest generation Xeon, until the v3’s are released).
    That gives you (on each socket) 6 cores running in 2.6GHz, with AVX. That’s not a weak compute capability by any measure.

    Would that work for your needs?

    #4601

    Marvin
    Participant

    that would be nice, whats the price per socket on that one?

    #4602

    Marvin
    Participant

    and just to be clear, is the $180 per active processor for very old Core based Xeons? the one that had FSB and no HyperThreading right? we replaced these C2D based xeons last year at the place I work, the oldest hardware we work are nehalem based Xeons(2P)

    #4603

    Benzi
    Participant

    Check out “the Configurator” (http://www.scalemp.com/configurator), – and you will see that a $180 for annual subscription per socket is available for many of Intel’s processor models, from the E5530 (Nehalem) through E5645 (Westmere) and E5-2630 (Sandy Bridge) to E5-2630v2 (Ivy Bridge).

    The cost per socket has to do with the processor model, not the generation. Each generation has processors for which the license costs more or cost less.
    If you want, you could send a list of processors you have available (on existing/old hardware) to sales <> scalemp ^ com, and we’ll reply with cost per the models requested.

    #4604

    Marvin
    Participant

    Thanks

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